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BLAST Elementary Thematic Program
Heroes

(January and February 2006)

 

I Need a Hero!

In this program students will have the opportunity to discuss: "what is a hero, and who gets to be one?" We will not only answer these important questions, but will give the opportunity to learn about several very special heroes. A hero worthy activity included! Recommended for grades K-1.

Fiction Books:

Big Bad Wolf is Good Big Bad Wolf is Good by Simon Puttock


What Makes a Hero? What Makes a Hero? by Irene Trimble

Informational Text:

Community Helpers: Police Officers by Dee Ready

Heroes of the Day Heroes of the Day by Nancy Louis

Quick Standards:

1.6. A&B.-Speaking and Listening

8.3. A.-United States History

Websites:

http://www.ardainc.org American Rescue Dog Association

http://www.nasar.org/ National Association for Search and Rescue

Craft materials:

  • Award cutouts
  • Markers or crayons

Activity:

Allow students to create their very own "Hero Award". Students will be thinking of one of their heroes (past or present) to create an award for. Students will write their hero's name on the front of the award. Then on the dangling ribbon they will write words that describe why that person is a hero. Students can decorate award cut outs with markers. Encourage them to write a letter, poem, song, or draw a picture on the back of the award. If time permits, let students share with the class

 

What's Your Favorite Hero? (.and we don't mean the sandwich!)

This program will introduce students to a wide variety of heroes. Students will investigate (through books, multi-media materials, and extension activity) the wide variety of heroes there are.

Recommended for grades 2-3.

Fiction Books:

Super Dog: The Heart of a Hero Super Dog: The Heart of a Hero by Caralyn Buehner

Police Cat Police Cat by Enid Hinkes

My Dog, My Hero My Dog, My Hero by Betsy Byars

Maxi, The Hero by Debra and Sal Barracca

Informational Text:

The Great Serum Race: Blazing the Iditarod Trail The Great Serum Race: Blazing the Iditarod Trail by Debbie S. Miller

Animal Rescuers Animal Rescuers by Rosanna Hansen

Hero Dogs: Courageous Canines in Action Hero Dogs: Courageous Canines in Action by Donna M. Jackson

Quick Standards:

1.6. A&B.-Speaking and Listening

8.3. A.-United States History

Websites:

http://www.ardainc.org American Rescue Dog Association

 

Craft materials:

  • Award cutouts
  • Markers or crayons

Activity:

Allow students to create their very own "Hero Award". Students will be thinking of one of their heroes (past or present) to create an award for. Students will write their hero's name on the front of the award, and then on the dangling ribbon they will write words that describe why that person is a hero. Students can decorate award cut outs with markers. Encourage them to write a letter, poem, song, or draw a picture on the back of the award. If time permits, let them share with the class.

 

Let Me Be Your Hero!

Heroes and heroines come from many walks of life. In this program students will be given the opportunity to explore pieces of literature (both fiction and non-fiction), multi-media materials, and an extension activity. Recommended for grades 4-5.

Informational Text:

Rosa Rosa by Nikki Giovanni

Meeting Famous People: Rosa Parks-Meet a Civil Rights Hero Meeting Famous People: Rosa Parks-Meet a Civil Rights Hero

Dear Dr. King: Letters from Today's Children to Martin Luther King Jr. Dear Dr. King: Letters from Today's Children to Martin Luther King Jr. Edited by Jan Colbert and Ann McMillan Harms

Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. by Doreen Rappaport

Coretta Scott King: Civil Rights Activist by Joanne Mattern

Schloastic Book of Outstanding Americans Schloastic Book of Outstanding Americans by Shelia Keenan

50 American Heroes Every Kid Should Meet 50 American Heroes Every Kid Should Meet by Dennis Denenberg and Lorraine Roscoe

My Heroes, My People My Heroes, My People by Morgan Monceaux

Quick Standards:

1.6. A&B.-Speaking and Listening

8.3.a.-United States History

Websites:

Craft Material:

  • Award cutouts
  • Markers or crayons

Activity:

Allow students to create their very own "Hero Award". Students will be thinking of one of their hero's (past or present) to create an award for. Students will write their heroes name on the front of the award, and then on the dangling ribbon they will write words that describe why that person is a hero. Students can decorate award cut outs with markers Encourage them to write a letter, poem, song, or draw a picture on the back of the award. If time permits, let them share with the class.