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BLAST Early Learning
Families

Books:

Peeny Butter Fudge by Toni Morrison & Slade Morrison; illustrated by Joe Cepeda

Children spend the day with their grandmother, who ignores their mother's carefully planned schedule in favor of activities that are much more fun.

 

Full, Full, Full of Love
by Trish Cooke; illustrated by Paul Howard

For young Jay Jay, Sunday dinner at Gran's house is full of hugs and kisses, tasty dishes, all kinds of fishes, happy faces, and love.


 

Open-ended Questions for Peeny Butter Fudge:

      • The words on the page tell us that Nana is sick. What does the picture show us?
  • What do you think the mom thought when she got home from work?

   

 

Rhymes:

Hello, My Name Is Joe

Hello my name is Joe and I work in a button factory
I have a house, and a dog, and a family
One day, my boss said to me, “Hey Joe, are you busy?”
I said, “No”.
He said "Turn the button with one hand."

(Repeat above, each time adding a new motion and exchanging the last line with…

He said “Turn the button with two hands.”

He said “Turn the button with one foot.”

He said “Turn the button with two feet.”

He said "Turn the button with your head.")

On the last repeat, say:
One day, my boss said to me, “Hey Joe, are you busy?”
I said, “YES!”

Fingerband

The finger band is coming to town,
coming to town, coming to town
The finger band is coming to town
so early in the morning.

This is the way they march & march,
march & march, march & march
This is the way they march & march
so early in the morning.

This is the way they wear their hats...
This is the way they play their drums...

The finger band is going away,

going away, going away
The finger band is going away
so early in the morning

 

Vocabulary Word:

patience: n. the ability to wait calmly

Patience, patience. No need for haste. Every piece has its place.”

(taken from Peeny Butter Fudge by Toni Morrison & Slade Morrison;
illustrated by Joe Cepeda)

 

Activities:

Math: Family Member Pictograph
Ask each child how many members are in their family. Then make a pictograph showing how many members are in each child’s family.

Art/Craft: My Family Quilt (www.everythingpreschool.com)
Materials: Construction Paper,
Crayons/Markers, Glue, Cardboard

Directions:  Have the children bring in a picture of each of their family
members (be sure to tell the parents that they will not get the pictures back) and have the children cut the picture into pieces. Then have them make a quilt by gluing small pieces of
construction paper and the pieces of the picture together

Science: Family Match (www.everythingpreschool.com)
Ask the parent to bring pictures of themselves as a baby and the children as a baby. Then let your students try to match them up. (Write names on tape back so as not to get them mixed up, yourself). This will help the students use their observation skills to see similarities and differences between the photographs.

Science: Baby Sensory (www.everythingpreschool.com)
Bring in baby oil, baby shampoo, baby lotion and baby powder. Let children wash their babies in the sensory table.  Dip cotton balls in each substance and put each in a film container to have a smelling game.

 

Literature:

Feast for 10 by Cathryn Falwell

Numbers from one to ten are used to tell how members of a family shop and work together to prepare a meal

 

So Much
by Trish Cooke; illustrated by Helen Oxenbury

Relatives arriving in succession give in to their desire to squeeze and kiss and play with the baby.


 

Where Is Home, Little Pip?
by Karma Wilson; illustrated by Jane Chapman

After Little Pip the penguin gets lost she meets a whale, a kelp gull, and sled dogs who cannot help her, but with the aid of her family's song, home finds her.


 

Sleepy Bears
by Mem Fox ; illustrated by Kerry Argent

When winter comes, six sleepy bears are rhymed to sleep by Mother Bear.